Becoming an airline pilot

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airborne
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Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 22 Jan 2008, 05:37

How is it done? I know it is tough but I have my whole life ahead of me and I really want to be one. What do you need to study, what are good colleges for this, what are some requirements? Please fill me in.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by detpilot » 22 Jan 2008, 06:10

When you turn 16, take a tour of Western Michigan University. It's only about a 2 hour drive from you.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by Northwestdc9 » 22 Jan 2008, 06:17

The main thing you need is money and LOTS of it.
Training costs are gonna run $60,000+ and a college degree to go with it.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by Samuel Arnold » 22 Jan 2008, 06:25

Here's a typical pathway for an Airline Transport Pilot:

Money will be necessary, but not as important as brains and ability.

1. Learn to fly: Take your introductory flight at your local aeroclub. From here, you can begin taking lessons with an instructor at the club and when you are of age and skill, apply and sit for your PPL (Private Pilot Licence).

2. Fly: Once you've got a PPL and are flying solo, get your hours and practise your flight in a private light-aircraft.

3. Go commercial: Once you have the hours of flying, the necessary skills and knowledge, then you can sit the exam for your CPL (Commercial Pilot Licence).

4. Get a job: Find and apply with a little airline, operate scenic charter flights or be a flying instructor (like the guy who taught you to fly in the first place). This will give you hours, skills and all the experience that all the big airlines are craving.

While going through the previous steps, a very good idea would be to go to a College or Training Institute and get a diploma or degree of some sort, just to give you that extra knowledge and value.

5. Rating yourself: You need to gain ratings for a specific aircraft. I'm not too sure on how you'd go about this, but by now you should have a few friends who will be able to help

6. Climb the ladder: Move up from your wee airline or charter business and get a job with a small airline (who operates, say, Cessna Caravans or Beechcraft 1900's).

7. National airline job: Get a position as a First Officer (co-pilot) for a large airline and begin flying jets, like CRJ, 737, A320, etc.

8. ATP: Airline Transport Pilot (the Captain). You're now the captain of that 737-300 that flies over your house each day in that fabulous livery of your nation's airline. Wonderful. From here, you can work your way up through the airlines and aircraft, until one day you are flying the left seat of a 747 for Singapore Air.


Hope this helps :wink:
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by Northwestdc9 » 22 Jan 2008, 06:28

Here in the US the ratings go like this:

PPL - IFR - Commercial and Multi - Turbine and ATP (Usually gained from the airline) - Type ratings
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 22 Jan 2008, 06:29

At what age do you reccomend getting a ppl?
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by detpilot » 22 Jan 2008, 06:30

Turbine
There is no actual turbine rating, although turbine aircraft require a type rating. (or any aircraft that weighs more than 12,500 lbs).
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by Northwestdc9 » 22 Jan 2008, 06:34

airborne wrote:At what age do you reccomend getting a ppl?
Here in the US you can't get it until you're 17.
I'll be getting mine within 48 hours of turning 17! :lol:
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 22 Jan 2008, 06:54

Cool, thanks guys. Well I got a few years to go, I guess I'll stay virual for now.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by Samfc » 23 Jan 2008, 22:26

sorry to kinda drag this off topic;

I am currently getting flight lessons. lets say i get my PPL once i am 17, and then apply to Daniel Webster College in NH. What kind of grades do i need to get to get in Early Decision? i am a mostly A and B+ person, and will most likely be in Geometry as a freshman. lets say i get into college, and get a degree. what degree would i want to get? after college, what do i do?

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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 24 Jan 2008, 01:38

Samfc wrote:sorry to kinda drag this off topic;

I am currently getting flight lessons. lets say i get my PPL once i am 17, and then apply to Daniel Webster College in NH. What kind of grades do i need to get to get in Early Decision? i am a mostly A and B+ person, and will most likely be in Geometry as a freshman. lets say i get into college, and get a degree. what degree would i want to get? after college, what do i do?

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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by Samfc » 24 Jan 2008, 01:52

airborne wrote:
Samfc wrote:sorry to kinda drag this off topic;

I am currently getting flight lessons. lets say i get my PPL once i am 17, and then apply to Daniel Webster College in NH. What kind of grades do i need to get to get in Early Decision? i am a mostly A and B+ person, and will most likely be in Geometry as a freshman. lets say i get into college, and get a degree. what degree would i want to get? after college, what do i do?

Sam
bump
sorry?

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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 24 Jan 2008, 01:57

bump= Bring Up My Post :D, Just trying to get you an answer.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by sanins192 » 24 Jan 2008, 19:04

I thought bump was just a way of 'bumping' an unread post to the top of the list.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 25 Jan 2008, 00:56

sanins192 wrote:I thought bump was just a way of 'bumping' an unread post to the top of the list.
It is...
but it also stands for

Bring
Up
My
Post

Either way works :D
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by simpilot459 » 30 Jan 2008, 06:55

I think if you get all A's and B's in High School, you should do ok. Flight programs are usually very competitive. just remember that even high school graduates with 4.0's get C's and D's in College. If you want to be a professional Pilot, I would reccommend going into a Flight program at University. I'm learning that getting into flight as a non-flight (Aero Engineering) major is difficult, and hard to manage time wise.

I have a lot of friends in the flight program here at Purdue, but they say it takes a little extra work to get to the airlines after graduation. here, I believe your only garanteed about 350 hours at graduation. getting involved in things such as a flight team or other activity helps build time. I know here, that if you are in the top 10 of your class, you get to fly the Beechjet 400, something that really attracts potential employers. After you get a degree in flight, and build hours, you can go to the regional airlines. their requirements are usually something like 500-700 hours total time, and about 100 hours multi. I believe that the airlines will help you get your ATP and type ratings, but I'm not sure. to get into the larger stuff, such as 737, it's something like 1,500-2,000 total time, and 700 turbine PIC time I think. just go to your favorite airline's website and search for pilot job openings, they usually have the requirements. point eing, if you want to fly the big jets, it takes a lot of time commitment and money. you also need to realize that pay out of college is vary low. For Purdue grads, average starting pay is $25,000. to put it in perspective, I was making $36,500 as a tourguide for Boeing last summer, and for us engineers, average starting pay is $55,000-$65,000.


Point here is make sure it's something that you really want to do. If you start taking lessons, and find that you begin to view flying as something you have to do (ie "Man, I really wish I didn't have a flight lesson tomorrow, I'd rather do something else") you might consider something else. I hope this was helpful.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by seahawks7757 » 30 Jan 2008, 07:18

Also the total cost will run you around $65,000.00 or so and you have to be at least 23 before you can pilot for the major airlines (meaning getting your commercial licence)
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by detpilot » 30 Jan 2008, 12:07

you have to be at least 23 before you can pilot for the major airlines (meaning getting your commercial licence)
Actually, you need to be 18 to get a commercial license. 23 is for an ATP (Airline Transport pilot) which you only need to get as a captain. Most airlines have a minimum hiring age of 21.
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by seahawks7757 » 30 Jan 2008, 18:28

detpilot wrote:
you have to be at least 23 before you can pilot for the major airlines (meaning getting your commercial licence)
Actually, you need to be 18 to get a commercial license. 23 is for an ATP (Airline Transport pilot) which you only need to get as a captain. Most airlines have a minimum hiring age of 21.
Oh yes got my license names mixed up. Thanks Brandon for fixing that. :winking:
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Re: Becoming an airline pilot

Post by airborne » 31 Jan 2008, 05:28

Thanks, my cousin is a pilot for continental. I just emailed him and asked him how he got the job. I'll keep you guys posted.
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